NIRO Knowledge – Episode 8

Lorna Ferguson

Lorna Ferguson is a Ph.D. student in the Sociology department at the University of Western Ontario, Canada and is the Director of Operations for the Canadian Society of Evidence-Based Policing (CAN-SEBP). Lorna’s current research focuses on evidence-based policy, policing, and missing persons. Specifically, she examines police responses to missing by conducting interviews with police personnel from across Canada – missing persons coordinators, Search and Rescue members, police detectives, frontline officers, with the hope of filling in knowledge gaps on ‘what works’ ‘what doesn’t work’ and ‘what we still don’t know’ in terms of how to most effectively and efficiently response to missing person reports.

Links:
Lorna on Twitter
Lorna’s email: lfergu5 <at> uwo.ca
Lorna’s research on Missing Persons
CAN-SEBP – Canadian Society for Evidence Based Policing

NIRO Knowledge – Episode 0.3

What is worse than someone who doesn’t yield when coming onto the highway when they don’t have the right of way at all? I’m not sure but I engage the listeners by wondering if we can come up with various problems to be solved and if we can find out how much of a problem they are. My scenario wonders if those who don’t yield when coming onto the highway create the traffic back up that then causes stress and aggression and might increase road rage incidents.

Take to Twitter and let me know what daily problems you see that would be great to research.

Links:
http://social.niroca.com/Twitter
https://resources.niroca.com/CAN-SEBP
https://resources.niroca.com/US-SEBP

NIRO Knowledge – Episode 3

John Ng

Special Constable John Ng is a divisional crime analyst with the Saskatoon Police Service and has been a law enforcement analyst for over 10 years. He’s a certified law enforcement analyst with the International Association of Crime Analysts and has been an active member having volunteered with their former Methods Subcommittee co-authoring a handful of technical papers on analytical methods including hotspot analysis, prioritizing offenders, and social network analysis and currently volunteers with their Publications Committee.

He’s presented at crime analysis conferences and recently at the American Society of Evidence-Based Policing (EBP) Conference on the role of crime analysts in EBP. He also served as the Analyst Series Coordinator (lead) for the Canadian Society of Evidence-Based Policing’s (CAN-SEBP) Community Engagement Team and continues to volunteer as a Community Liaison for CAN-SEBP promoting the value of law enforcement analysts in EBP. More recently he’s been selected as an NIJ/IACP LEADS Scholar, which is a scholarship that helps support mid-level officers in advancing data and science in policing, he is one of the first crime analysts to received this scholarship.

He’s successfully completed a Master of Science degree in Criminal Justice from St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia and an Honours Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology from the University of Toronto. His research interests include police culture, police leadership, organizational change, police tactics & strategies, hotspots policing, offender management (and risk assessments), and crime analysis.

Links:
CAN-SEBP on Twitter
CAN-SEBP online
John on LinkedIn

NIRO Knowledge – Episode 1

Dr Laura Huey

Dr. Laura Huey is the Director of the Canadian Society of Evidence Based Policing and Professor of Sociology at the University of Western Ontario. She is also a member of the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists of the Royal Society of Canada, a Senior Research Fellow with the Police Foundation, and a Research Fellow for the London Police Service. She also formerly sat on the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police Crime Prevention Committee and was formerly a member of the Board of SERENE-RISC (a Canadian Centre of Excellence on Cybercrime).

In this episode, Laura talks about the relevance of evidence based policing, data, the crime analyst, and how analysts can get involved in performing research.

Links:
LEADS Scholars – Canada
BetaGov

**Update 1/10/2020**
Special thanks to Steve Harmon who listened to the podcast and knew the study that escaped me during this show. Here is the Pacific Standard article and here is the link to the academic article about how “stop and frisk” could be creating negative effects on black and Latino juvenile males.